Night at Oak Alley

History Comes to Life at Louisiana's Oak Alley Plantation and Inn.

Oak Alley emerges hazily from a Southern fairy tale, humid and sweet with a strongly graceful beauty. A first drive past the planation allows a glimpse of two even rows of very old live oak trees leading up to a symmetrically columned house peeking under the branches at the end of a brick path. Yet, to spend a few hours here only begins to hint at the depth of its timeless character. The ability to spend slow hours at this property affords it a special feeling I haven’t experienced at any other historical site. Every moment of the girls’ weekend I spent at the Oak Alley Inn with my best friend felt like I had discovered a treasure.

After driving rural miles down the old river road, past other fabled plantations, my friend, Sarah Rice, and I arrived in the wake of a gulf coast evening downpour. The staff greeted us warmly in the Inn’s welcome center near where a wedding party was gathering. One of the friendly employees handed us frosty lemonades and escorted us to the cabin we had booked for the night. She showed us all of the amenities in the essentially perfect little house tucked away on the back of the twenty acre property.   My friend and I had chosen the next to last guesthouse on the row of cottages.

The décor felt fresh in a contemporary manner, and the best part of the little house was that it was so clean, there was very little evidence anyone else had ever even stayed there before this weekend. I joked that I could have happily changed my address to Cabin 8 Middle of Nowhere, LA. A rustic fireplace made living area feel cozy, and a large screened porch invited lounging while watching the last of the summer hummingbirds buzzing around the cabin’s feeder. I’ll also mention, the place was bigger than my sister’s apartment in Atlanta.

Yet, the most exciting feature the hostess led us to was a flashlight charging in the bedroom. “You’ll need to bring this flashlight when you explore the property tonight,” she told us.

As soon as my friend and I heard this, we couldn’t wait to take up the invitation to discover what happens after dark on a property with over 200 years of history. The true magic of the Oak Alley Inn is that guests are encouraged to stroll the grounds of the planation twenty-four hours a day, whether or not any public tours are open. After eating a hearty, casual meal at the nearby DJ’s restaurant, my adventurous friend and I hurried back to the cabin to put on sneakers and grab the flashlight.

Not to lie, I had expected to frighten myself a little, imagining what could be lurking in the country fields or even (despite my rational thoughts) what presence from the past may be gliding in the shadows. Yet, the only resident to creep behind us was the tabby cat we had met earlier in the moving and educational slave quarters exhibit.

The long walk from our cabin, through the heart of the planation and almost to the Mississippi River beyond was surprisingly comfortable in a way that felt like I was truly getting a chance to live on the property and get to know it for myself without anyone else’s interpretation. I got the sensation that if I did discover there were vampires to interview in the sticky, Louisiana night air, they truly would be suave and sophisticated and would join us for a stroll before disappearing back across the low-lit brick porch and into the house’s locked front doors. It felt like we weren’t just imagining scenes from movies or the past, we were living them.

Design Moment

Two candles that spark memories of Oak Alley

One of the most memorable things about the immaculate little cabin I stayed in at the Oak Alley Inn was the soft, mint wall color. The tone was fresh yet soothing and lent a relaxing vibe to our cabin.

If you aren’t ready to repaint an entire room, though, this Williams Sonoma candle in the same color can help set a restful tone in your home. I like to enjoy the fresh Lemongrass Ginger scent in the kitchen.DSCN2378

I also can’t help but picture New Orleans gas lamps flickering over columned porches whenever I think of Louisiana nights. Although, this little Lifetime Candle by White River Designs isn’t exactly gas, it’s a different than a regular wax candle and the flame flickers more dramatically when reflected in the oil base.

 

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Just remove the little glass ball and add the wick, which is included in the box. The lifetime candle can be refilled over and over to enjoy for a lifetime…or many, just like time spent at Oak Alley.

 

 

Swiss Adventure? ALPsolutely!

Hi Readers,

If you’re from a very flat city like I am, let me tell you a little story about driving in the Swiss Alps.

Creeping along the narrow road, we faced the unnerving reality that the other side of a steep mountain lay between us and a straight road. We had steered ourselves wrong. Well, maybe that way was right. Actually, it was definitely right and then left and then right again about fifty five times. Our rented Peugeot had just tackled half an alp. Olivia (my sister), Dean (her boyfriend), and I had accidentally found ourselves at the apex of Switzerland’s Furka Pass.

This adventure had begun in the picturesque ski town of Zermatt, Switzerland where we had spent the day summer skiing, and our destination was Germany’s Neuschwanstein Castle. Dean and I had spent the evening before choosing what appeared to be the most reasonable route for this road trip. We had eliminated any drives through Lichtenstein and Austria, which would have required the international driver’s licenses we didn’t have. Also, a highway passing through Italy before returning to Switzerland also seemed like a poor choice because, “why drive more miles and add more border crossings?” Therefore, we chose what looked like the least complicated path from Zermatt, through Zurich, then up to Germany.

The first leg of the journey wound through miniscule, post card towns where our chief complaint was the wildly fluctuating speed limit. Olivia road shotgun, reading aloud about our destination while I passed snacks of raspberries and tomatoes up to Dean, the driver. After meandering past dozens of chalets with dark wooden balconies and slate roofs, we were finally speeding through what seemed like an endless spring green valley when we noticed a street cutting back and forth up the rocky mountain parallel to our drive. We all agreed that would totally be a perfect road for the Grand Tour guys to tackle in one of their death defying challenges and breathed a sigh of relief when our highway continued without turning to toward that mountain.

Then we noticed the highway had started to climb almost imperceptibly off of the valley floor. Weird, but at least our road was wide and straight…until it wasn’t. We were about a third of the way up the mountain when we realized we were on that Top Gear road. Our chosen route had switched back to snake steeply up the mountain.

My GPS resembled a messy signature, and every few feet, we saw memorial markers near the sheer drop off the side of the single lane road.

To make matters worse, we discovered that what would only make sense as a one lane road was carrying two way traffic. At every one of the dozen or so switchbacks, we had to wait on the far side of the street with only inches between our tires and the cliff while oncoming cars inched past. Visions of Bolivia’s “Death Road” filled my imagination as tension grew in the car.

Olivia and I found Dean’s nervous laughter abrasive in the light of the life or death experience we believed we were facing. My right hand was sweating profusely from my grip on the door handle despite the temperature drop outside as we neared the snow line, but we finally reached the top. Focusing through Olivia’s and my ceaseless warnings to “watch out for that car!,” and “stay away from this cliff,” Dean had gotten us safely to the glacial peak of an Alp. I realized all Olivia and I could really do as passengers was trust that our driver would navigate us carefully to the valley on the other side.

Descent from the mountain was no less stressful, but Dean stayed focused, avoiding cars and cliffs, both inches from the sides of the car and often at the same time. Once we reached flat ground, Dean and I switched drivers, so he could basically rest off the effects of shock and a tension headache in the backseat.

I don’t think any of us will forget this alpine pass, known previously only from action movies, such as James Bond. I also learned the importance of traveling with people you can trust in stressful situations.  Travel challenges us as we face the unexpected.  You can’t plan for every adventure, and you never know what’s around the next corner, but you can choose your travel companions.

Safe travels,

Erica

Mini Vacations: Arkansas

 

Blanchard Springs, AR

    July trip, Swimming & Spelunking

Even if your family is anything like mine and loves Heber Springs just as much as the next Memphian, I’m back in town to tell you…it’s time for a change.

We left the boating and innter tubing behind a few weeks ago & spent a day swimming in the little river between Blanchard Spring and Gunner Pool.


It was so beautiful!

The water is crystal clear.  Even the shallowest part in this photo is about a foot deep!

This is Blanchard Spring, whose water feeds the swimmable river.

…but a word about the water…

It is swimmable…it is NOT potable!

Just on the other side of that waterfall is a cave

…a cave full of bats!

The National Forest Service tells me I don’t want to drink bat debris, and I’ll take their word for it, but more about the bats later… 

Be sure to bring waterproof shoes!

You’ll also want at least one float (or two life jackets & a pool noodle).There are lots of places to wade into the stream.

If you’re lucky, you can see little fish and huge tadpoles.

If you’re like me, you’ll need to watch out for water snakes. I wish I were kidding. There is even the Mirror Lake fishing pond…which I enjoyed more for the waterfall than the trout.

After swimming & hiking, you can even cool off with the bats.

Well, actually you probably won’t see the bats (thank goodness), but it is perpetually a pleasant 58 degrees in the Blanchard Springs Caverns.


The “battleship,” or “Titanic rock,” as my sister & I like to call it is my favorite formation (excuse the nerdiness). Can you see it in the spotlight? Isn’t that neat?!

The network of lights & pathways through on the Dripstone Trail is truly impressive, and even though I just don’t feel comfortable taking a tour that combines the words “wild” and “cave,” the Wild Cave Tour (without theater lights & meandering pathways) also sounds really fascinating.

So, those are some of the high points from Blanchard Springs!

With Fourth of July only a few weeks away, I just wanted to share with you a new place to celebrate with a short adventure.


Hope you’re having a truly wonderful weekend,

  Erica

Mini Vacations: Millington, TN

Millington, TN

      July weekend trip/ Winery Visit Round 2

Ok, I get that Millington isn’t even outside of Shelby county, and some people even consider it part of Memphis (ahem Justin Timberlake), but still isn’t a vacation any break from ordinary life?

Yes, it is, so here are some of the things my sister & I recommend after our first trip to Millington:


1. Shelby Forest– It’s nice that Memphians have such a large, natural setting so close to home.  Point of interest: apparently Shelby Forest is home to one of America’s best disc golf courses (haha, strange).


2. Shelby Forest General Store– The atmosphere is very Bass Pro meets Appalachia. My sister’s boyfriend recommends the ice cream bars.


3. Old Millington Winery– This winery may not be as showy as Arrington in Nashville, but these wines are also delicious, and there is a large deck where you can relax and enjoy your purchase. Also, many weekends, there there is live music. I recommend the blackberry wine, although everyone else loved the Strawberry. We brought home a bottle of very refreshing Delta White…here’s its cheery label!millington vineyard

Mini Vacations: Ghost River

Ghost River, TN

    June weekend trip/ fun at a swamp


By now, everyone in Memphis has probably heard of the Ghost River Brewing company. So, when my family found out that there really is a section of the Wolf River that looks just like the mysterious picture on  the brewery’s labels, we decided, why not check it out?! 


Now, I don’t want anyone to think this isn’t a fascinating place to visit, but I’ve added some some travel advice to this little vacation post that other websites didn’t let me know before I visited.


1. Canoeing and kayaking are decidedly the best options for experiencing this natural area.You can follow the driving directions on the few websites that offer them.

However, really this one view is all you can see from the road:Wolf River

from Bateman Rd, again:

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2. Even with directions, the park isn’t exactly user friendly.

After stopping at a few muddy, river landings, we followed locals’ advice & drove down a random road, through what I’m sure was someone’s back yard, across a temporary bridge, and into the woods to find the only visitors’ info board we saw all day.ghost riverHere’s the info, just in case you don’t want to traipse through other people’s property.

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3. Ghost River is, in fact, a swamp, not a river. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.

Notice the intense mud at the foot of the trees… yet another reason to boat through here.ghost river

4. Despite some drawbacks, Ghost River really does have a unique beauty.0526141317a-3
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Mini Vacations: Nashville

Sometimes, even when my family can’t take a very long or thoroughly planned vacation, we find ways to have lots of summer fun close to home. Hopefully, the mini vacations I’ll share through the next few posts will inspire you to take your own little breaks from everyday life.

Nashville, TN

June weekend trip/Winery Visit Round 1

Once upon a time, my sister, my mom, and I hopped in the car to visit my aunt & cousin in Nashvegas!

We started our very short trip with a visit to History Channel’s own Pickers.antique archaeolgy

Ok, this isn’t exactly the gigantic warehouse full of rust I was expecting…

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In fact, it was a bit more of a Nashville flavored tourist-trap.

But there was a lot to look atantique archaeology

Not even sure what some stuff was…

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While we didn’t purchase much…I got a Picker pick from music city…ok, I thought it was clever.

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and we may not have wanted to buy some things at all…eek!

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we did have a very good time!

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After a few country music star encounters (or look-alike encounters),

we spent a girls’ afternoon at Arrington Vineyards

nashville winery

Oh my gosh, maybe it’s the wine talking, but I can not say enough good things about this place. Y’all, I want to have my birthday here; does that tell you anything?!

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You can sample up to four varieties of wine.

Be sure to try the Chardonnay and especially the Raspberry (yum!)

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…oh and there are delicious raspberry chocolates…i know they’re not really wine but….

Even though there was a wedding, birthday party, live country music, and the rustic front porch was just generally packed while we were there, it was pretty easy to purchase our favorite wine and find a picnic table with a great hillside view.

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Wow we love stripes!

What a beautiful day!

 

O Camden! My Camden!

Camden, ME- Where the mountains meet the sea

Every time friends mention they are going to Maine, I feel secondhand excitement just thinking of all the fun they are going to have.

Camden, ME is one of my favorite, if not my favorite place in the US. I’ve been visiting Camden every few years since I was pretty little, and every time I leave, I can’t wait to go back. Once, I told someone that Maine is better than 95 percent of the the places you can visit in the world, and my sister quickly told me that was a low estimate.

Places to stay on a trip to Maine:

I would highly recommend staying in Camden as your home base and balancing your trip with both exploring this little town and taking day trips along the cost. There are also several very cute, very small towns in which to stay. For example, tiny Rockport is very quaint and quiet but still close to everything.

There are obviously no bad neighborhoods to avoid. In town, the Gaylord Camden is very nice, but the place my family and I have loved the most is the 200 year old home in Rockport that we found on Airbnb.

Activities

You will definitely need to rent car even if you will be staying primarily in one town. When my family visits Maine, we really spend a lot of time sightseeing and enjoying nature. We frequently take drives or hikes just to see the scenery and find a new lighthouse or adorable roadside store along the way. Maine is very rural and historic, which is a lot of its charm.

Perfect things to do in Camden-

  • Eat breakfast in one of the little restaurants downtown
    • Mariners has a patio right over the little waterfall that pours into the harbor and has both beautiful views and pancakes with Maine blueberry jelly, yum!
    • My sister’s boyfriend claims that blueberry muffins at the Bagel Cafe behind the Lord Camden are the best food he’s ever eaten…to the point that he ate two there and one on the way home… but I love the bagels.
  • Stroll around the lawn in front of the Public Library. There just isn’t a more peaceful place.
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Camden Public Library
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View of Harbor from Park
  • Take a Windjammer Cruise.I highly recommend the Schooner Appledore.The tours are always beautiful, of course.The guys who sail the ships are characters who make the trip fun. You’ll see seals, Camden harbor, and lighthouses!
    • There are a several tours available. My family really enjoys the short cruises of an hour or two during the day or even at sunset.
  • Hike or drive to the top of Mount Battie for a panoramic view of Camden’s place along Maine’s jagged coastline and rocky islands.DSCN2306On fall afternoons, pick apples at a nearby farm.
    • There are quite a few places to pick apples and many varieties of apples, so just run a google search to see what’s near you.
    • This activity is best done at the beginning of the trip because you’ll want to want to bring a few apples with you when setting out for each day’s adventures. You may also have a chance to make and enjoy an apple pie if your place has a kitchen.Tour the little shops in the little downtown. You’ll find everything from quality clothing to souvenirs and nicknacks. The Smiling Cow is a classic.
  • After dinner (or really anytime), grab an ice-cream at Camden Cone.

Fun in surrounding towns:

  • Owl’s Head Lighthouse is my very favorite lighthouse.
    • This is in a very forested promontory with a little museum and gift store in the old keeper’s quarters, and you can hike down to a little rocky beach to one side.
    • In Rockland, ME

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  • Walk out to the Breakwater Lighthouse.
    • This is kind of a trek. It’s located a little over a quarter mile walk out in a bay over a breakwater of large rocks.
    • In Rockland, ME
    • While there, also check out the Samoset Hotel.

 

 

My family loves to visit Art Galleries.Farnsworth Museum

    • The main museum in Rockland houses a collection of contemporary and historic American artists with a specific wing dedicated to the works of the Wyeth family.
    • The Farnsworth also owns the bleak and weathered Olson House in Cushing, ME. This home inspired and is featured in many of Andrew Wyeth’s paintings, including Christina’s World.
    • Many painters have been inspired by Maine, so even small galleries are filled with great art. My favorite of these is the Wiscasset Bay Gallery, which just happens to be just steps away from a wonderful antique store and what is said to be Maine’s best lobster rolls, Red’s Eats.

 

  • A trip to Maine is essentially a challenge to eat as many lobster rolls as humanly possible. There are many awesome places to eat this delicacy. Camden’s best restaurant, Cappy’s, is out of business, so my family is still on a quest to find a replacement. The best lobster rolls are served in roadside stands by local fishermen, not in restaurants. Don’t be shocked, though, if they charge restaurant prices…lobster is lobster, but it is so worth the price. Lobster rolls here are the best you will find anywhere in the world.
    • Recently, the best lobster rolls I have had were at Libby’s Market in Brunswick, ME. Don’t be surprised that the little dining area is in what looks like a regular gas station. The rolls are very good and fresh. The owner and his wife catch the lobster themselves.

 

 A Little Farther Away from Camden:

  • Go to Acadia National Park!
    • The place comes alive for leaf peepers in fall. Bar Harbor is a nice place to visit near the park entrance.

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  • Visit the L.L.Bean Flagship Store with the giant Bean Boot out front. L.L.Bean was founded in Maine, promotes an outdoor lifestyle, and supports the National Park Foundation…could there be a better company?
  • Visit the other awesome outlet stores. The Patagonia outlet in Freeport, just across the street from L.L.Bean and the Barbour outlet in Kittery can’t be beat.

Design Moment

For tourists, Maine basically wouldn’t exist without ships. Ships bring in lobster and sight seeing scooters sail through almost every bay. Therefore, nothing captures the essence of Maine at home more than ship decor.

You can go classic by purchasing an oil painting from a local gallery,

Or you can get a little kitsch with an antique mobile.

Bonus points if your mobile is next to a picture of Owls Head